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this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness started. certainly no sign of anything last friday when kate was playing hockey in high heels. nor had there been any hint of what was the county -- was to come a couple of days earlier. william was presented with a baby gift. doctors say severe sickness that such an early stage should not be a cause for early concerned -- because of concern -- be a cause of concern. >> it is a difficult time for them to be going through. >> william and kate have wanted to start a family. this is what they said in their engagement interview. >> i think we will take it one step at that time. we will get the marriage first, then think about kids. obviously, we want a family. we will have to start thinking about that. >> scarcely had the wedding taken place and the couple appeared on the balcony than speculation about a royal baby began. every time she had a royal -- she had an encounter with a baby, people wondered when she would have a ba
the world. prince william joye and his wife -- joins his wife kate in hospital. we will bring me the latest. a powerful typhoon has been battering the philippines. dozens of deaths are reported and more than a 50,000 have been forced to flee their homes. a report from manila. >> it is the worst typhoon to hit the island. bringing heavy rain and wind up to 210 kilometers an hour. even for a country accustomed to violence weather, this is a truly massive storm. roads are closed and bridges damaged and crops destroyed. no match for its strength. >> i was in the kitchen and i heard a crack. something fell on the house. everything collapsed. >> the typhoon brought back painful memories of this time last year when a typhoon killed the 1500 people. this has twice the wind speed and there are fears there could be substantial loss of life. there was no warning -- more warning this year. >> this tyvon is not a joke. it is the potential destruction it could cause. this could be the strongest to hit the country this year. >> they are fleeing their homes for evacuation centers. tens of thousands heeded
been admitted to the hospital hours early. william left monday night, looking pensive. in the early hours of tuesday, the australians call the hospital switchboard. >> hello, good morning. >> hello, there. could i still -- christ -- could i please speak to kate, my granddaughter? >> yes, hold on man. >> are they putting us through? >> yes. >> if this works, it is the easiest prank call we have ever made. >> in the ensuing conversation, which we are not broadcasting, a nurse gave details about kdot condition. like any patient, she is entitled to confidentiality. the hospital released a statement this morning that it regretted the incident. this was a jewish -- foolish prank call -- this was a foolish pranks call. the call should never have got through. >> the call should have been put through to the contactor be at the time. it should not have gone through to a member of the nursing staff at the hospital. >> they said they were sorry and wished kate well. she has had more visitors than before. her brother and sister arrived this afternoon. her mother came to be with her tonight. and
in america, with patricia williams, michelle alexander, and eugene jarecki. >> i think it is possible to change people's minds about the war on drugs without making it a race issue. in fact, you know, every poll that's been done shows that white americans in particular don't want to hear about race or racial bias or the racial dimension of any issue, let alone mass incarceration on the war on drugs. but i believe we would be making a huge mistake if we were to pursue drug policy reform without talking about the racial dimension of this crisis. because if we do, if we go about our advocacy in a color-blind way and talk just about cost savings and dollars and cents, and the benefits of drug treatment, never address the racial dimention, we will fail to learn the critical sson that this moment in our history has to teach us. marion cotillard, andrew solomon, and a look at incarceration when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. rose: marion cotillard is here. she came to fame with her oscar-winning performance in
on a global level. britain welcomed news today that prince william and his wife catherine are expecting their first child. the announcement said the 30- year-old mother is in the early weeks of pregnancy. she's hospitalized in london with a severe form of morning sickness, and she's expected to remain there for several days. the baby will be third in line to the british throne. prince charles is first, followed by william. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to jeff. >> brown: how tough is too tough when it comes to sports and brain injuries? it's an issue we've followed over a number of years. today there was new data to chew on. week after week the big hits keep attracting big audiences to professional and college football. but concerns over head injuries in football and other sports have also continued. the connection between repeated blows and a degenerative brain disease known as c.t.e. the latest evidence comes from a new report from boston university that's been published in the scientific journal brain. the four-year study examined brain autopsies of 85 male don
of the time. >> my name is william carroll. i live in north olli beach. pretty much for 50 years. today is my first day allowed into the house. look at the angle of the house that we dropped. we probably dropped a good 2 feet. everything in here was floating. what do you take and what do you not? you want to take everything, but you cannot. you are limited on what you can leave with. >> start taking my pictures down. i will take some of them. all of this is going in a pile and you get to pick and choose what you want to keep and what you do not. >> today it has hit me a little bit. i feel it. i try not to show it, but i'm hurting inside. >> i will never be coming back here again. i will not have the stuff that i had. the memories are gone. a lot. >> my name is margaret. this is my vacation home. when we saw the devastation on television to all the new was that the beach was ground zero. we did not know if our house would be standing we open the door and realized we had about 3 feet of water in the house. >> you can see the water line. >> what i bought this house i wanted to flood insurance an
for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is nbr. captioning sponsored by wpbt >> tom: good evening. i'm tom hudson. susie will be along a little later in the program. disappointed-- that's how the top republican on capitol hill described the pace of progress on avoiding the fiscal cliff. we discuss where the talks stand with a top democrat, senator kent conrad of north dakota. and the glitter of silver-- it's
: and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org >> this is "bbc world news america." funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business, offering specialized solutions in capital to help you meet your growth objectives. solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news america." >> this is bbc world news america. reporting from washington, i'm laura trevelyan. the u.n. makes an historic vote the u.n. makes an historic vote to
-mails to a women in tampa. the former commander of africa command, general william ward, was demoted one rank after being accused of lavish spending. and brigadier general jeffrey sinclair, who was deputy commander of the 82nd airborne division in afghanistan, is facing sexual misconduct charges, including sodomy and wrongful sexual conduct. a new book looks at american generals over the last century. the author is veteran journalist tom ricks. the book is "the generals: american military commanders from world war ii to today." ray suarez spoke to him recently. welcome to the program. >> thank you. suarez: i think reading as a nonmilitary expert but an interested party, the most surprising thing was that so many men who were not really up to the task became generals in the first place. how did that happen? >> george marshal's when he was chief of staff of the army was that generalship is one of the hardest things there is in the world to do. you have to be intellectually and physically engaged and there's enormous stress. it burns people out. his attitude was a good number of people are simply goin
and i had in williamsburg where you were the chancellor of william and mary which is a part-time job. you told he that there was an agreement among the people who participated from the white house, from cia, from defense, not to talk about it, and it took five minutes. >> five or six hours. >> five or six hours and now we have had two books, a documentary, and soon to be released a major film about it. what is intriguing about it is two things, one is this took place in the decision making at the white house, the preparation by admiral and all of the people who serve under him and his participation, the fact you kept it secret from the pakastanis, and the fact that there was, according to all of these things, some extraordinary woman at the cia who somehow was the person who understood the link to finding out where osama bin laden was in abbottabad, and was a courier, does that make sense to you, have you followed these stories? >> i have followed them. and i mean to be honest about it, what i knew was that there was a team of analysts working this at cia, and that had been working
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)